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The Problem with Low-Fat Diets

The Problem with Low-Fat Diets

There’s a lot of talk out there as far as which diet is the healthiest. And you’ve probably heard about the high protein diet, Paleo, Keto, South Beach, Atkins, etc. There seems to be a different diet for every day of the week.

But the reality is, humans are created as omnivores, so we can enjoy a little bit of everything. The interesting thing about that is that we often get into a ‘rut’ in the way that we eat. For example, if we’re doing a Keto diet, we get used to that form of eating.

The challenge with that, from a physical standpoint, is that because we have all these different processes in our bodies for dealing with all these energy sources, some of those pathways may get turned off.

This may sound counterintuitive from what you’ve learned from some of the traditional training out there, but the low-fat diet is not healthy. The reason is because it turns off the fat burning mechanisms within our bodies. If you want to turn on a machine, do you take away it’s fuel source? The answer is no, and the same holds true with our diet.

 

To learn more about this topic, listen to our full podcast where Dr. Brett J. Earl MD discusses the problem with low-fat diets, the benefits of diet diversity, and why IV nutrients actually work.

 

On this episode of the Denali Podcast with Dr. Earl:

  • (0:20) The problem with low fat diets
  • (3:19) What is Diet Diversity?
  • (6:33) Diet Diversity & Your Body
  • (8:11) Why are nutritional IV’s beneficial?
  • (13:05) Things to look out for when delivering/receiving IV nutrients
  • (16:31) Bio Active-C compared to other Vitamin C supplements

For more episodes of the Denali Podcast with Dr. Earl, subscribe on YouTube or iTunes.

Denali Medical Center was founded by Brett J. Earl, MD, who leads a team of experienced and compassionate providers. This team is passionate about educating patients on empowering treatments that enhance overall wellness. This approach enables their patients to make well-informed decisions about their health care to avoid illness, prescriptions, and surgery.

To learn more about Denali Medical Center, visit DenaliMed.com.

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Benefits of Fasting

Benefits of Fasting

In recent years, fasting has become very popular in terms of health and fitness. But, before you jump into the trend for yourself, you should be aware of the different types of fasting and their benefits.

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent fasting is going to be your starting point. This is when you compress the time you eat into a 6 to 12-hour window. That means you go without eating (but you can drink water) for a 12 to 18-hour period. This includes sleep time, so you can easily get 8 hours out of the way without even knowing it.

This is not something that should be done seven days of the week, so there are different ways in which people go about it. For example, if you’re following the 5-1-1 method, you would intermittent fast for five days, feast for one day, and then dry fast for the last day.

Dry Fasting (24 Hour)

Dry fasting is when you completely eliminate both food and water, typically for a 24-hour period. When doing this type of fast, it only takes your body about 12 to 18 hours to realize that it has to switch to a different energy source. Instead of relying on glucose, your body then uses fats and other metabolites. This actually gives the liver exercise because it has to change to a new way of processing the foods and other things that come through.

Unhealthy and precancerous cells don’t do well with a diet that is not a steady stream of glucose. So, you end up forcing those unhealthy tissues out of the picture through a process called Autophagy — where your body eliminates unhealthy or old cells and replaces them with new and vibrant cells. Fasting is one of the most powerful ways we can do this. The process can start within 10 to 15 hours with no food or drink.

72-Hour Fasting

Going three days without food seems nearly impossible, so it’s a good idea to work your way up.
Start with intermittent fasting and get yourself comfortable with 18 hours without food. Next, do several 24-hour fasts (Do this over the course of several months, not every other day). At this point, you’ll already start to notice a positive difference, giving you motivation to keep pushing.

One of the major benefits of fasting for this long is that it resets your mast cells, which are essentially the control switchboard for the immune system. If these cells are given a steady glucose diet and don’t have to switch over to something else, they can live for 20 years. Over the course of those 20 years, they are constantly adding memory. Unfortunately, a lot of that memory is bad and can cause confusion to the body. Autoimmune disease is skyrocketing because people are not resetting these mast cells.

Long-Term Fasting

Anything over 72 hours without food is considered long-term fasting. At this point, you’ll start to burn fat at a higher level, your immune system will continue to reduce, and you’ll eliminate a lot more insulin from your system. This type of fasting tends to be popular with those who are obese or have diabetes.

3 Critical Steps before a Lengthy Fast

The idea of eliminating food and water from your diet can be intimidating, but in reality, the body is amazing. It’s designed for this.

If you are planning on doing a fast of 24 hours or more, just make sure to safely work your way up and follow these 3 critical steps beforehand:

• Take a good multivitamin
• Keep up on your electrolytes
• Mild or moderate exercise (20-minute walk, gentle calisthenics, etc.)

 

To learn more about the types of fasting and their benefits, listen to our podcast below. Also available on YouTube and iTunes.

 

 

Denali Medical Center was founded by Brett J. Earl, MD, who leads a team of experienced and compassionate providers. This team is passionate about educating patients on empowering treatments that enhance overall wellness. This approach enables their patients to make well-informed decisions about their health care to avoid illness, prescriptions, and surgery.

To learn more about Denali Medical Center, visit DenaliMed.com.

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Resistant Starches, Grains & Your Health

Resistant Starches, Grains & Your Health

resistant starches grains and health

Diet & nutrition has been a hot topic, especially with the holidays going on. Recently, I had an interesting conversation with a friend who is extremely health conscious. By that, I mean they understand the body, they exercise, and they eat religiously, not just right, but religiously.

We were talking about quinoa and they said, “Oh, that is the worst food ever because your body can’t use it. It just rots in your guts.”

This brought me back to the idea of resistant starches and how some of the information that we’re getting out there is claiming that they’re useless to the body. But as far as being useless, that’s not the case.

In fact, these resistant starches can be some of the most amazing foods that our bodies can receive, as long as we are preparing them the right way and eating them the right way.

There are all kinds of information out there about what the healthiest diet is. And unfortunately, you hear a lot about the Keto diet, you hear about Atkins, you hear about the South Beach diet, you hear about fasting. They all have a place and have some benefits, but in terms of everyday life, we have to understand diet the way that our bodies need it.

People tend to talk about how bad grains are for our system. But the reality is, it’s not the grains that are bad, it’s what we have done to the grains.

Let’s use wheat as an example.

Before WWII, we ate wheat, right? Now think about the obesity rates back then. They were extremely low, and we had wheat in everything; bread, pasta, etc.

After WWII, we wanted to mass produce everything from our weapons to our clothing. Everything changed. We even changed the way we make bread. Scientists in the food industry started to cross breed wheat so it was bigger and fuller. What they noticed is that they got more bang-for-the-buck energy, although it wasn’t necessarily great energy.

Another thing we have altered is our yeast.

The way we used to make bread (and still do in Europe) was by mixing it up with a yeast starter the night before. The powerful thing about this preparation is that these starters would chew up the gluten. So, we would essentially end up with a very low gluten bread. Or if it was left longer, we could even get zero gluten bread from wheat.

Over time, that process was cut out and we began using rapid rising yeast. At first, they would just throw the flower and yeast in together, but it was so crumbly they couldn’t do anything with it. Then they thought, what are we going to do with this?

Well, if you’ve ever wondered where the name gluten came from, it’s because it acts like glue. So, again they continued to cross breed the wheat until it had increased gluten (which is the thing that has caused a big problem with the wheat in today’s society).

Basically, we are no longer taking care of wheat the right way. We’re putting it into our system in an altered form, and we’re suffering the consequences from it. And wheat is just one of the examples. We do a similar thing with rice. We do a similar thing with beans.

By taking the extra time to prepare these foods the right way, we end up with these resistant starches that allow a nice, slow release of carbohydrates into our system and propagate the healthy microbiome. And the benefits of that? The list could go on and on. It’s just a matter of getting back to some basics, properly preparing our food, and doing it for health rather than for speed and convenience.

 

To learn more about resistant starches and how to properly prepare your food, listen to our podcast below. Also available on Youtube and iTunes.

 

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